Comments

bekah's picture
bekah
0

It's absolutely bizzare to me when a company does this kind of thing.  At my last job, we had to fill out paper work for something as mundane as a papercut.  A lot of the cooks would cut themselves so bad they'd need stitches and then try to hide it because they refused to do paperwork.

imrae's picture
imrae
0

The company I was on placement with had a similar policy. I think the reasoning was that if you know you're *supposed* to report papercuts, then you won't ever hesitate to report something because you're unsure of whether it's "worth" reporting.

Incentives are still a problem: clearly the trick is to set it up so the person getting injured isn't the one doing the paperwork, or losing their pizza!

Homer's picture
Homer
0

Where I work, we have a pretty good policy: You can either fill out the complete paperwork or, when you are unsure whether it is worth the trouble, you just sign that you took something from the first aid kit. Then, when anything serious comes from it, you still have insurance because you can "prove" that it happened at work.

miasaki666's picture
miasaki666
0

heh. back where I volunteered they just hada station where every possible medical tragedy could be fixed by yourself. :P That included (evidently) broken bones.

Ronald Riehn
1

Different environment in the military. Especially in a combat arms unit. Everybody trying to be macho, work through legitimate injuries. End up hurting themselves worse and getting scolded by the medics. There's nothing more entertaining to watch than a Private First Class -ordering- a Master Sergeant (rank difference of five grades as well as an average of 15 years experience) to go to the clinic. They put up such cute protests.

crazydan05's picture
crazydan05
0

Yeah, as a PFC it really shows how rank doesn't necessarily mean smarts.  I work in a Corps unit and I'm showin' Sergeant Majors and Lieutenant Colonels + how to install a simple printer. ;)

Fuseblower's picture
Fuseblower
0

The best little gem we ever had over this was when the staff responsible re-stuffing the first aid cabinets dotted around the place went around removing all the useful stuff - mainly antiseptic sticking plaster - from all of them. Since the plaster packets were clearly the most used item in them, we asked why.

The reply, whilst technically correct, left us somewhat gob-smacked. Apparently the plasters were removed because technically, they weren't 'First Aid' as such, but... a definitive treatment! We attempted to counter this by asking them whether, if this was the case, we could leave the plasters on top of the cabinet, so they weren't in the 'First Aid' category any more, but they said no, they weren't even prepared to supply them.

We found out who the person responsible for this decision was, and (anonymously, because he was powerful in other ways) made a ceremonial 'Jobsworth Of The Year' award for him. Fortunately for us, he was *not* amused!

Ronald Riehn
0

I think I know the exact stuff you're talking about. That same thing happened in the office one of my friends works at a few months ago. Apparently the bulk container that all the little packages came in had a marking on it that said "to be used by trained personnell only". Naturally the bean counters above freaked and pulled the entire stock. My buddy organised a counter though - he arranged with all the other department heads over the last couple months to ensure that at least one out of every five people in the company was certified in Advanced First Aid, to include a notice from the clinic that said  that they counted as 'trained personnell' for the plasters. He presented this to their boss, who took it to his boss, and up and up until it reached the right person to amend the previous decision, and now this month the stuff started rotating back in.

Terezi's picture
Terezi
0

I'm srs-medic-guy at work.  Security for the whole complex.  I make people do paperwork even for that damned papercut, even though it irks both me and the 'victim' to do it in the first place.

The cooks love to get stitches and burns though, maintenance also tends to cut themselves from time to time.

Weird thing though; My boss fell and slipped on some ice coming into work last winter.  He didn't fill out any paperwork, and it turned out that he accidentally broke a collarbone or something.  Missed like a month and a half of work without pay.

Andrew Kunz
1

I really would like the hat with the flashing red warning light. That would be worth filing all injury reports.

omniwarrior's picture
omniwarrior
0

I am trained for that kind of stuff outside what is normally done at work. We are all tech-heads, but it seems as though I have training from so many disciplines. Fortunately, I work with people who are not stupid and since everything is electronic, no papercuts. EMAIL ROXX!!!

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