Comments

Ronald Riehn
0

-SOME- mechs have an appreciation for precision tools and would not use them for a brute force job.

And what self respecting mechanical engineer doesn't carry a multi-tool or three on them at any given time? Or a pocket tool kit? Or is that just an American thing?

Samuel's picture
Samuel
0

Unfortunately, Leatherman multi-tools don't come in metric configurations, so they would be useless to Canadian engineers.

Ronald Riehn
0

Leatherman is only one brand. I had a Gerber and a CRKT that were both metric-only. My current choice of Gerber has both metric and imperial.

Jam's picture
Jam
0

You see this a lot in the US but in Vancouver it's rather uncommon to carry a leatherman or pocket knife.

Ronald Riehn
0

I am a bit biased by my limited experience with Canadians, and honestly even among others in the US I'm more... shall we say equipped? My regular day bag has a wide variety of basic hand tools in it. Clench wrenches, a ratcheting socket set, a ratcheting screwdriver, a small claw hammer, locking pliers, a 'precision' tool kit (tweezers and an array of small screwdrivers), and at least one multi-tool.

And yet not a week goes by I don't use at least one thing from my bag outside the house.

Silver's picture
Silver
0

Even as an Aero student most my friends carry around a couple tools, everything from scissors to screwdrivers to duct tape to wrenches. I myself use a creditcard multitool...

dpride00's picture
dpride00
0

As a mechanical that likes to use his tweezers for both the fiddly bits and the brute force, I highly suggest some micro pliers http://www.mcmaster.com/#micro-pliers/=ujft9r

Fuseblower's picture
Fuseblower
0

Can only agree. Works for both disciplines, really - use the appropriate tools for the job, and micro-pliers are good! Surface mount stuff is a different matter though - had to build some special tools to do prototyping effectively with this, but they are quite simple to make.

Jam's picture
Jam
0

I could have used one of these today

Fuseblower's picture
Fuseblower
0

Sometimes the useful tools are *really* simple... https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQSfU602oCVJ9y8Vczi2_dsze8Y6MFxHAXzrCxWj2Sw38UthsXU5Q

The one I made was a bit more complicated, though. Uses the PCB drill stand, but replaces the drill with a spring-loaded point facing directly downwards. Holds even the smallest components in place for soldering. Also check out Handi-vac for picking them up - http://www.leenol.com/index.php?_m=mod_product&_a=view&p_id=768

votecoffee's picture
votecoffee
0

And now the big question, did you guys actually catch the depicted tweezer siezer, or is he an archetype?

Epitome's picture
Epitome
0

Yes, but even when the tweezers are pristine, its Loki's own joke on anyone who's trying to populate through-hole boards to try to keep those little bastards on target, much less in the board. Tap the board with a feather, and awaaaaaaay they go.

S'toon's picture
S'toon
0

You can tell he's an engineer and not a technician or a technologist. A technician or technologist would never populate a PCB without prepping the components first. Engineers are notorious for bad soldering.

Peep_erz's picture
Peep_erz
0

Is it socially acceptable for engineers to call those tweezers? Over in my world, biologists call those forceps and we are teased and taunted if we ever call them tweezers.

Ronald Riehn
0

Forceps itself is an almost exclusively medical/biological term. There are physical differences between the tools though. If it doesn't have a hinge or lock and the teeth at the end are smooth, both terms are correctly applicable. If there is texture to the teeth or a hinge or lock in the body for leverage, they are forceps.

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