Comments

TheSpyJimmy's picture
TheSpyJimmy
2

There is a far far better way to cook corn, m'dears.

Leave it in the husk - Trim off the top part of the tassels. Set your oven to 400 degrees - Put it right on the oven rack, in the middle. Bake for 40 minutes, turning halfway through. The silks will pull right off, it'll make your whole house smell like delicious corn, and it cooks it perfectly.

-From an Ohio Sweet Corn Addict.

Valerie Kaplan
1

Cut the stem end off, enough that you've severed the bases of all the husk leaves. Microwave for a few minutes. Tug off the husk and the silk will come with it!

snooper1989's picture
snooper1989
0

My oven doesn't go up to 400 degrees... But it's notated in Celsius >.<

Mark Penrice
1

~205'C, then, m'pedantic dear.

Also, woo, I got a working account again/at last/delete as appropriate.

Mark Penrice
0

...doesn't seem to allow me the ability to post a new thread though :(

So:
"What's all this "silk" and "cracking" business? Confused brits who buy their corn either ready-to-boil or in tins from the supermarket demand to know, without being so proactive as to google for themselves..."

;)

TheSpyJimmy's picture
TheSpyJimmy
0

Basically, corn on the cob - when it's fresh in the husk - typically needs to be cleaned off before they're cooked (unless using my method, or cooking them direct on the grill).

Inside the husks there are these little threads called "Silks" or "Tassels" depending on who you ask - they're typically wet and very sticky in fresh ears and are sometimes threaded in between the kernels themselves - since these silks are not tasty nor edible, they have to be cleaned off generally before you can eat - most cooks use a stiff bristled brush to get them off

Cracking is used to make the corn-ears smaller, usually because you're going to include them in some kind of boil - It also makes them easier to portion out to your hungry family or self.

Kira's picture
Kira
1

actually, if you cut off one end while it is in the husk and put it into the microwave for 6 min per ear of corn, the corn will sliiiiide out easy as pie and completely clean!

programmerman1's picture
programmerman1
0

I don't know, 30 seconds to a minute in boiling water sounds far more efficient than 40 minutes in the oven.

-- Occasional corn eater in the Cornhusker State.

Lewis's picture
Lewis
0

I did the same thing with eggs once. Verrry early in the morning

Nira's picture
Nira
1

I detasseled corn when I was younger. Worst job I've ever had (beats out factory work). To this day I can't bring myself to eat corn on the cob.

That's not to say I don't cook it on the cob and just slice it off before I eat it. :) My favorite way (although not the most efficient or usable on a whim) is to open up the husks - do not remove, take out as much silk as possible, slather with butter and salt, close the husks back up, twisting at the end, then skewering it on a hot-dog stick (or on an over-the-fire grill rack) and roasting over a campfire. Not only do you get the delicious taste of corn, but it's great fun when you're camping, and all the "waste" is biodegradeable.

--Previous Spayer of Corn, Central Illinois

Andrew's picture
Andrew
0

The tassles and husks make great starter fuel for campfires or compost for those short-sword sized green beans you've been growning, Jam.

Arks and Sparks's picture
Arks and Sparks
0

All good tries; here is the best.

Pull the silk tuft off. Gently peel back the husk but do NOT remove. Place a tab of butter in it. Wrap with two strips of bacon in a double helix. Place the husk back on and wrap with tin foil tightly. Set in the hot coals of a grill turn half way through.

It has bacon. FTW.

maratei
0

bacon...corn. you win, sir. although, it might be just a tad difficult to eat with making a huge mess and dropping bacon bits everywhere. how long do you grill it for?

Amandapants523's picture
Amandapants523
0

Now I really want some corn on the cob. D:

Ronald Riehn
1

Sooo many ways to do corn.

I do it this way -

Warm up the grill. Soak the whole cobs, stem and husk and all, in cold water for about ten to fifteen minutes. Throw the cobs on the grill before your entree and remove them when you start to see grill marks on the outer husks. If you have a multi-level grill and put them on the main grill surface, turn them once in awhile so they cook evenly - else just leave them they'll be fine. Indirect heat is better than direct heat, you don't have to turn them.

Done right, after a quick rinse the husks will come off all in one clump. You may have a stray strand here or there but it's just fiber. Add butter and seasoning to taste and enjoy! (or be like my dad, stand the cob up on end on your plate and use a knife to shave off all the kernels.)

Ronald Riehn
0

If the ends catch on fire, you're fine! It's just the husk.

Mark Penrice
0

Just got back from a week long break in turkey ... there were guys along the beach and in several other busy and touristy areas cooking and selling corn in almost exactly the same way as this (I think they actually parboiled them rather than just soaked, but, eh). I choose to take that as a sign that it must be a pretty effective way of preparing the bare crop for quick and easy human consumption.

Do slightly regret not giving it a go, but then I didn't exactly have infinite time or funds. A few other things besides had to give (not least the ready cooked, lemon drizzled mussels and a couple of trips out). Can always go back!

Ronald Riehn
0

It's just that a very quick, easy and effective way of cooking them. The corn inside stays juicy, the husk outside (if properly soaked or boied) makes sure you don't accidentally torch your prospective meal.

maratei
0

my church does this as an event every year. cook a bunch of hot dogs/hamburgers (or pot pie, like this year), roast a ton of corn, everyone brings desserts, and the church makes some money selling it.

maratei
0

my church does this as an event every year. cook a bunch of hot dogs/hamburgers (or pot pie, like this year), roast a ton of corn, everyone brings desserts, and the church makes some money selling it.

mad matx's picture
mad matx
0

Aw, shucks.
(Ican'tbelieveanyonehasn'tsaidthatyet!)

Mark Penrice
0

It's the title of the comic itself!

Fuseblower's picture
Fuseblower
0

Can't be doing with corn on the cob myself - don't particularly like the taste, but as you lot have proved, the effort to food ratio is appalling!

And because it's been so humid, I'm quite pleased that what passes for 'summer' these days is passing as well.

Okay, I'm probably going to be in a minority of one, but I don't care.

V5Aussie's picture
V5Aussie
1

You want to talk appalling effort to food ratio, let's talk artichokes.

Ronald Riehn
1

Considering corn is a grain, the effort to food ratio is actually surprisingly low if you keep it simple. There's -nothing- simple about artichokes.

Fuseblower's picture
Fuseblower
0

Never tried artichokes to the best of my knowledge, although I've heard stories about preparing them, yes. But as far as the effort-to-food ratio of corn is concerned, it's a lot lower if you let some machinery do most of it for you. You may say that it doesn't taste as good, and I'm sure you'd be right about that. But for me that's hardly a consideration, because I don't like it anyway! I'd far rather eat chocolate...

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